Exelon Chapters to take part in virtual tour commemorating 19th Amendment

The Exelon – Peach Bottom and Exelon – Kennett Square chapters are taking part in a virtual tour at the Brandywine River Museum of Art for their exhibit titled – Votes for Women: A Visual History (https://votes.brandywineathome.org/). This exhibit commemorates the 100th anniversary year of the passage of the 19th Amendment. A series of videos […]

The Exelon – Peach Bottom and Exelon – Kennett Square chapters are taking part in a virtual tour at the Brandywine River Museum of Art for their exhibit titled – Votes for Women: A Visual History (https://votes.brandywineathome.org/). This exhibit commemorates the 100th anniversary year of the passage of the 19th Amendment. A series of videos have been produced by the museum (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYqVYBTIm7u10UiYvUTi4l1QuKB0Fy4ds ), and the chapters will have a streaming event to watch and discuss on September 25, 2020. The chapters intend to have an open discussion after the virtual tout, talk about interesting tidbits, and see how this compares to current societal movements and changes. There will also be a virtual happy hour after the watch party and discussion.

 

From the Brandywine Museum website: In the absence of televised and digital media, the women’s suffrage campaign played out very differently from political movements today. Suffragists spread their message through magazines, political cartoons, posters, plays, parades, and even through fashion. This exhibition at the Brandywine River Museum of Art examines the visual culture of the suffrage movement, revealing how the “look” of women’s rights developed. While the Nineteenth Amendment granted women the right to vote, many voting struggles persisted for marginalized groups following its ratification. Presenting an inclusive historical narrative, the exhibition recognizes the efforts of women of color, which have been largely overlooked. The visual lessons of the suffrage movement provided a model for later activism, including the civil rights and social justice movements, making this not just a centennial commemoration, but a window into contemporary visual discourse.